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Conceived as a park and cultural center, the Lotus Building in Wujin, China was designed by.Studio505

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Dogbane (Apocynum androsaemifolium). Found throughout most of North America. Since they tend to spread and overwhelm most garden plants, and they’re poisonous to children and pets, dogbane is not cultivated.Pictures via  Matt & Dave

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IRONY: Oil refinery threatened by sea-level rise, asks government to fix problem

I pointed out last week that the major oil companies are actually much more willing than Republican politicians to admit the reality of climate change. I offered a few explanations as to why, but left out an important one: If you’re in business, you simply cannot afford to ignore the effects of climate change. The oil industry in particular builds expensive infrastructure, and its scientists and engineers use the best available science to design, situate, and manage that infrastructure. After all, you cannot make smart plans to exploit newly accessible Arctic oil if you don’t admit that the polar ice cap is melting.Here’s an ironic case in point, via the Sierra Club’s blog: An oil refinery in Delaware is asking taxpayers to pay for protecting it from rising sea levels. The refinery is on the waterfront, and rising tides and extreme storms could threaten it. The federal Coastal Zone Management Act provides grants to states for projects such as building out natural barriers, like dunes, to protect against storm surges. Delaware has such a program in place. And now the oil refinery, after contributing to climate change for more than 50 years , is coming with its hand out.

IRONY: Oil refinery threatened by sea-level rise, asks government to fix problem

I pointed out last week that the major oil companies are actually much more willing than Republican politicians to admit the reality of climate change. I offered a few explanations as to why, but left out an important one: If you’re in business, you simply cannot afford to ignore the effects of climate change. The oil industry in particular builds expensive infrastructure, and its scientists and engineers use the best available science to design, situate, and manage that infrastructure. After all, you cannot make smart plans to exploit newly accessible Arctic oil if you don’t admit that the polar ice cap is melting.

Here’s an ironic case in point, via the Sierra Club’s blog: An oil refinery in Delaware is asking taxpayers to pay for protecting it from rising sea levels. The refinery is on the waterfront, and rising tides and extreme storms could threaten it. The federal Coastal Zone Management Act provides grants to states for projects such as building out natural barriers, like dunes, to protect against storm surges. Delaware has such a program in place. And now the oil refinery, after contributing to climate change for more than 50 years , is coming with its hand out.

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Butter Lupine (Lupinus luteolus), Ano Nuevo State Reserve.

Butter Lupine (Lupinus luteolus), Ano Nuevo State Reserve.

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Tree hugger

Tree hugger

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mypubliclands:

Say hello to “Ernie,” the latest addition to the BLM Miles City Field Office paleontology public display. “Ernie” is an ancient alligator species, excavated by the Burpee Museum in eastern Montana on BLM-administered public land. 

This skeleton was cast from the original remains of this remarkable reptilian resident of ancient Montana. BLM Archaeologist Doug Melton is holding a photo of the pose that Ernie will assume when all his parts are assembled and he’s ready for the display case. 

Photos by BLM Eastern Montana/Dakotas District Public Affairs Specialist Mark Jacobsen

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A highly endangered gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Most field specimens are usually darker due to dirt on the carapace. They are incredibly important keystone species, the burrows they create provide habitat for as many as 360 species of animals.

A highly endangered gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Most field specimens are usually darker due to dirt on the carapace. They are incredibly important keystone species, the burrows they create provide habitat for as many as 360 species of animals.

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 In Push To Protect Big Coal, Alabama Officials Say New EPA Regulations Violate God’s Will

Pushing back against new Environmental Protection Agency standards limiting carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, Alabama officials gathered Monday to argue that the new federal policy flouted the Almighty’s will by regulating a God-given resource.“Who has the right to take what God’s given a state?” Alabama Public Service Commission (PSC) member-elect Chip Beeker asked during a news conference held in the offices of the Alabama Coal Association on Monday, according to AL.com.
…The EPA has estimated that, nationally, the reduced emissions will produce climate and health benefits worth an estimated $55 billion to $93 billion per year in 2030, preventing 2,700 to 6,600 premature deaths and up to 150,000 asthma attacks in children.Cavanaugh and other Alabama GOP leaders were scheduled to testify on the regulations on Tuesday at an Atlanta EPA hearing.

These are pretty much the same people who used God as cover for thier lies about WMD in Iraq which resulted in the deaths and maiming of hundreds of thousands of people, including over 4000 of thier fellow Americans. Acting on carbon emissions will have health benefits and create jobs,
Further, CCS estimates that 20 additional policies implemented selectively at the national level or by states and localities would produce these benefits:    1.24 million net new full-time jobs by 2020;    $88 billion in additional GDP, accumulating to more than $ 1 trillion between now and 2030;    Net societal savings of more than $1.4 trillion between now and 2030;    A reduction in oil imports of 135 million barrels in 2020 and 5 billion barrels between now and 2030;    Greater diversity in our energy mix, less summer peak demand for electricity and better energy productivity (only 14% of the energy we consume today produces useful work);    A reduction of 466 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions in 2020 and a cumulative reduction of 13.5 billion metric tons between now and 2030

 In Push To Protect Big Coal, Alabama Officials Say New EPA Regulations Violate God’s Will

Pushing back against new Environmental Protection Agency standards limiting carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, Alabama officials gathered Monday to argue that the new federal policy flouted the Almighty’s will by regulating a God-given resource.

Who has the right to take what God’s given a state?” Alabama Public Service Commission (PSC) member-elect Chip Beeker asked during a news conference held in the offices of the Alabama Coal Association on Monday, according to AL.com.

…The EPA has estimated that, nationally, the reduced emissions will produce climate and health benefits worth an estimated $55 billion to $93 billion per year in 2030, preventing 2,700 to 6,600 premature deaths and up to 150,000 asthma attacks in children.

Cavanaugh and other Alabama GOP leaders were scheduled to testify on the regulations on Tuesday at an Atlanta EPA hearing.

These are pretty much the same people who used God as cover for thier lies about WMD in Iraq which resulted in the deaths and maiming of hundreds of thousands of people, including over 4000 of thier fellow Americans. Acting on carbon emissions will have health benefits and create jobs,

Further, CCS estimates that 20 additional policies implemented selectively at the national level or by states and localities would produce these benefits:

    1.24 million net new full-time jobs by 2020;
    $88 billion in additional GDP, accumulating to more than $ 1 trillion between now and 2030;
    Net societal savings of more than $1.4 trillion between now and 2030;
    A reduction in oil imports of 135 million barrels in 2020 and 5 billion barrels between now and 2030;
    Greater diversity in our energy mix, less summer peak demand for electricity and better energy productivity (only 14% of the energy we consume today produces useful work);
    A reduction of 466 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions in 2020 and a cumulative reduction of 13.5 billion metric tons between now and 2030

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Moth Orchid of the genus Phalaenopsis.There are approximately 60 species in this genus. This soft tan specimen is an especially nice example.

Moth Orchid of the genus Phalaenopsis.There are approximately 60 species in this genus. This soft tan specimen is an especially nice example.

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Wild orchid from Brazil by jacinta lluch valero

Wild orchid from Brazil by jacinta lluch valero