It’s a wrap: This illustration shows how the nanosponge’s solid polymer core (green) is surrounded by a red blood cell membrane (red). The blue structures represent absorbed toxins.
Nanoparticle Disguised as a Blood Cell Fights Bacterial Infection

A nanoparticle wrapped in a red blood cell membrane can remove toxins from the body and could be used to fight bacterial infections, according to research published today in Nature Nanotechnology.The results demonstrate that the nanoparticles could be used to neutralize toxins produced by many bacteria, including some that are antibiotic-resistant, and could counteract the toxicity of venom from a snake or scorpion attack, says Liangfang Zhang, a professor of nanoengineering at the University of California, San Diego. 

Bacteria that is resistant to traditional antibiotics has become a huge problem.

It’s a wrap: This illustration shows how the nanosponge’s solid polymer core (green) is surrounded by a red blood cell membrane (red). The blue structures represent absorbed toxins.

Nanoparticle Disguised as a Blood Cell Fights Bacterial Infection

A nanoparticle wrapped in a red blood cell membrane can remove toxins from the body and could be used to fight bacterial infections, according to research published today in Nature Nanotechnology.

The results demonstrate that the nanoparticles could be used to neutralize toxins produced by many bacteria, including some that are antibiotic-resistant, and could counteract the toxicity of venom from a snake or scorpion attack, says Liangfang Zhang, a professor of nanoengineering at the University of California, San Diego.

Bacteria that is resistant to traditional antibiotics has become a huge problem.